Captain America: Civil War review

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“This job… we try to save as many people as we can. Sometimes that doesn’t mean everybody. But if we can’t find a way to live with that, next time… maybe nobody gets saved.” This quote was from Marvel’s latest blockbuster, Captain America: Civil War. About a few week ago, I had the pleasure of seeing this film with my good friend Jeff (a.k.a. @JMR1022 on Twitter) and as a bonus, we attended Free Comic Book Day at the  Amazing Comic Shop (formally, the Laughing Ogre). Jeff had never been to a comic book store before, so it was great to see him, enjoying himself, looking at the figurines and comics. All in all, it was a great day. In fact, we plan on going back to the comic book store again later this summer after my final surgical procedure is done in June.

Captain America: Civil War is basically about how the Avengers become divided after the governments of the world decide to push for the Sokovia Accords after an incident in Nigeria, which resulted in innocent people dying. Tony Stark/Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) is in favor of the Accords because of his guilt over creating Ultron and never really getting over his parents death. In fact, a mother who lost her son in Sokovia confronts Stark about the Avengers and his actions, sparking his desire to support government oversight. Tony cites his reasoning as this, “Oh, that’s Charles Spencer, by the way. He’s a great kid. Computer engineering degree, 3.6 GPA. Had a floor-level gig, an intel plan for the fall. But first he wanted to put a few miles on his sole before he parked it behind a desk. See the world, maybe be of service. Charlie didn’t wanna go to Vegas or Fort Lauderdale, which is what I would do. He didn’t go to Paris or Amsterdam, which sounds fun. He decided to spend his summer building sustainable housing for the poor. Guess where: Sokovia. He wanted to make a difference, I suppose. I mean, we won’t know because we dropped a building on him while we were kickin’ ass… There’s no decision-making process here. We need to be put in check! And whatever form that takes, I’m game. If we can’t accept limitations, we’re boundaryless, we’re no better than the bad guys.”

While, Steve Rogers/Captain America (Chris Evans) is sympathetic to Tony’s feelings, Steve feels that government oversight would not only, hinder the team’s response to an emergency situation, but also the team could be used for political agendas. Steve responds to Tony’s argument by saying, ” Tony, if someone dies on your watch, you don’t give up. We are if we’re not taking responsibility for our actions. This document just shifts the blame… it’s run by people with agendas and agendas change. If we sign this, we surrender our right to choose. What if this panel sends us somewhere we don’t think we should go? What if there’s somewhere we need to go and they don’t let us? We may not be perfect but the safest hands are still our own.” Steve is further convinced that he is right when during Peggy Carter’s funeral, Sharon Carter (Emily VanCamp) while giving the eulogy brings up a conversation about how Peggy dealt with chauvinism. Peggy tells Sharon, “compromise where you can. Where you can’t, don’t. Even if everyone is telling you that something wrong is something right. Even if the whole world is telling you to move, it is your duty to plant yourself like a tree, look them in the eye, and say, ‘No, *you* move’.”

Things are further complicated, however, when Bucky Barnes/The Winter Soldier (Sebastian Stan) is accused of bombing the United Nations and killing the King of Wakanda. Soon tension rises and all-out war between Team Iron Man ((Iron Man, Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman), Vision (Paul Bettany), Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson), War Machine (Don Cheadle), and Spider-Man (Tom Holland)) and Team Captain America ((Captain America, Bucky Barnes, Falcon (Anthony Mackie), Sharon Carter, Scarlett Witch (Elizabeth Olsen), Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner), and Ant Man (Paul Rudd)) breaks out, thus changing the Marvel Cinematic Universe forever.

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Captain America: Civil War, overall, was awesome! Loved Spider-Man’s (Tom Holland was great as our favorite web swinger) fight with Ant Man and Black Panther’s fight with Bucky! I really enjoyed Falcon’s and Bucky’s interaction in the film. The scene where both Falcon and Bucky are fighting Spider-Man is especially golden. Jeff and I cracked up when after Spider-Man is taking out by Falcon’s drone bird, Bucky says, “You couldn’t have done that earlier?” And, Falcon’s response was, “I hate you.” Classic! Chadwick Boseman, as Black Panther, was a great move on the Russo Brothers (the directors of the film) part because he nailed the character brilliantly. Boseman brought depth to the character and I love what he says to Baron Zemo (Daniel Brühl) before he brings him in to face justice, “Vengeance has consumed you. It’s consuming them. I’m done letting it consume me. Justice will come soon enough. The living are not done with you yet.” This is pretty powerful and highlights the basic theme about the film. Tony’s fear about the Avengers breaking up and then discovering that Bucky killed his parents towards the end of the film further fractures the friendship between Tony and Steve. The ending of the film has ramifications for the Marvel Cinematic Universe as Thanos will be a huge threat in the next two Avengers film.

How will the Avengers handle this looming threat? While, the Avengers may be split for now, Steve promises Tony through a note that despite their differences, if he needs help, he and the rest of Team Captain America will be there; “Tony, I’m glad you’re back at the compound. I don’t like the idea of you rattling around a mansion by yourself. We all need family. The Avengers are yours, maybe more so than mine. I’ve been on my own since I was 18. I never really fit in anywhere, even in the army. My faith’s in people, I guess. Individuals. And I’m happy to say that, for the most part, they haven’t let me down. Which is why I can’t let them down either. Locks can be replaced, but maybe they shouldn’t. I know I hurt you, Tony. I guess I thought by not telling you about your parents I was sparing you, but I can see now that I was really sparing myself, and I’m sorry. Hopefully one day you can understand. I wish we agreed on the Accords, I really do. I know you’re doing what you believe in, and that’s all any of us can do. That’s all any of us should… So no matter what, I promise you, if you need us – if you need me – I’ll be there.”

I love what Steve says here because despite everything that happened in the film, Steve still respects Tony. Steve understands Tony’s anger and resentment for what Bucky had done while being brainwashed by Hydra. But at the same time, he’ll protect Bucky because it wasn’t his fault. Both Tony and Steve are very stubborn, but that’s why we admire them because they stick to their guns and never back down. Of course, they are consequences for their stubbornness, as illustrated in the film. I love that the film presents both sides equally and maturely. It didn’t present Tony as a villain like in the Civil War story line in the comics, nor did it make Steve totally innocent. Instead, it shows us that they are no winners in war, only losers. Both sides loss something. Tony loss some of his surrogate family, while Steve loss his credibility as a hero and is a fugitive from the law.

Overall, I give Captain America: Civil War a 9.0 out of 10.0! It was a blast! Best superhero film of the year! If you love Marvel or comic book movies, this film is for you. I highly recommend going with a friend. If you like my review, then please check out Jeff’s review. It’s really good and goes more in depth into the characters and plot of the film.

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